Business Best Practices—In Our New 2020 Reality

Mark Spiers

Association Boards strive to bring greater value to their residents, supported by professional community association management companies, their management teams, and numerous contractors providing a wide range of services. NOW we have a new challenge—the COVID-19 pandemic.

Business Best Practices—In Our New 2020 Reality

Mark Spiers

Association Boards strive to bring greater value to their residents, supported by professional community association management companies, their management teams, and numerous contractors providing a wide range of services. NOW we have a new challenge—the COVID-19 pandemic.

“WE’RE NOT IN KANSAS ANYMORE.”

Most will recognize Dorothy’s famous quote from the 1939 classic, The Wizard of Oz. It has come to mean that we are in unchartered waters, facing unforeseen challenges. It seems apropos to the COVID-19 pandemic and what the epidemiologists and public health professionals tell us will happen over the coming weeks and months.

So, how do we STAY SAFE and SERVE OUR CLIENTS?

It has come to mean that we are in unchartered waters, facing unforeseen challenges.

BUSINESS BEST PRACTICES … IN A FAST-CHANGING HEALTH CRISIS

In this challenging environment, volunteer Boards are working to protect their communities and take care of their properties. More than ever before, they look to their community association management teams and trusted vendors to step up. 2020 is NOT business as usual. Business has stalled—not stopped. The following proactive measures are a basic checklist. Some items are more than critical; others are common sense or jobsite-specific.

JOBSITE SAFETY—Laser-focused on Community Health

STRICTLY FOLLOW all CDC recommendations and those of trusted public health officials.

ALWAYS start conversations asking how they and their family are doing. Always! 
Listen and observe. Everyone is scared. Provide facts, clarity and steady leadership.
Create a robust, safety-driven and tactical-level “continuity” plan in this health and economic crisis. 

Focus your tactical plan on business resources, processes, employee behaviors, and client needs. 

Now more than ever before communicate clearly, providing extraordinary customer service. 

Improve communication with technology. Some employees will need more help than others. 

Mandate “stay at home” guidelines for employees that are ill. Financially support if you can. 

Business owners must understand and abide by HR and legal obligations. 

Business owners must insist all employees are constantly following CDC handwashing requirements and all social distancing guidelines in the office and at each project’s jobsite … as much as is possible. Can this be done differently?

Train employees to understand how to comply to new health safety requirements. Repeat. Reinforce. Verify. 
Listen to client concerns. If uncertain, ask “I heard you want this done. Is that correct?” Set the higher standard. 
Contractors must train jobsite Project Managers and Superintendents to INSIST—all crew members and subcontractors will be compliant with all employer and customer imposed health safety guidelines. Daily jobsite reminders are highly recommended. 
Pay close attention to client concerns about jobsite crew behaviors. Be proactive. Ask if there are ANY concerns.