Congruence–When Your Business Is Consistent

In the practice of mental health, a major goal is congruency—consistency among the perceived self, the actual self, and the ideal self. For organizational health, employee behaviors should be congruent with company goals. It is when … what you say you will do, is the same as what you do.

If you want to get colloquial, congruency is when a company “walks the talk.” The word alignment is used a lot in business performance theory. Whether it is describing culture, leadership, employee engagement, customer experience or other elements … it is basically matching words to behavior.

Strong and effective business cultures are congruent. Expectations are understood, and they are achieved.

We have all seen when the “boss” says one thing and does another, and how it damages morale and employee engagement. Or when an employee talks about doing a better job—but doesn’t. How about when businesses say, “we take care of our customers,” but don’t?

Because businesses are filled with people, there are organizational blind spots. Leaders can be over confident about their own abilities—no one likes to admit shortcomings. Inconsistency in organizational practices, or ones that don’t make logical sense, can damage employee motivation. Employee disengagement limits positive customer experiences.

Any of these negative elements can derail a company.

We know from science that energy is conserved, and that it is a function of where energy is directed. People can resist change because of the belief that it takes a lot of work to change. But if you observe people—it can be astounding to see how much energy is expended to maintain dysfunctional behavior, to deceive others, or to “put on a front?”

At GAPWORX we say, “you can’t change what you don’t know.” We talk about becoming more aware—before acting. People seek out mental health practitioners because they are stuck in behavioral patterns. Therapists provide insight and understanding to their clients, create alternative ways of thinking, and help them make better decisions. Likewise, for businesses—outside objectivity and perspective can be a real stimulus for positive organizational change.

Business leaders should strive for congruent organizations, where the actions of employees fulfill company mission and values. It is the satisfaction experienced by their customers … “they said it right, and they did it right.”